Restoring  Sephardic Anusim Identity

American Anusim

To watch Dell's presentations on his YouTube channel Click Here.

YouTube Videos

Recommended Books

Genealogy Resources

Join a network of family historians both experienced and new on social networking resources to make new connections and gain insight on how to expanding your family history resources. 

If you live in New Mexico, you can visit Albuquerque's Down Town Library and use there computers to have FREE access to ancestry.com


(more resources coming soon)

Someone once said that a DNA test is a short cut to happiness because it cuts through extensive time on a genealogical trek. It often leads to connecting  with 2nd, 3rd and 4th generation cousins that have been on the same journey and happen to have different pieces of the genealogical puzzle. 

By clicking on the logo that reads: Family Tree DNA, you’ll get instantly connected to the DNA laboratory in Houston, Texas. For best results, Dr. Sanchez recommends for men the Y-Chromosome 37 together with the Family Finder test. For women it’s the mtDNA 37 together with the Family Finder Test. Participants may upgrade at any time after test results are received.

The DNA Project

Learning Resources

Dr. Sanchez has published five book in English that he later translated into Spanish on the subject of his passion—the Sephardic Anusim among Hispanic/Latinos. Two of these books are CD narrations. He has also produced over 100 DVD’s on this subject.

Visit his Book Store

Discover your Jewish heritage


There are over 500 million Latino/Hispanics in the Western Hemisphere. It has been predicted that somewhere between ten and twenty percent have Sephardic Jewish roots. Some regions in this hemisphere have greater concentrations such as the Southwest of the U.S., northeastern Mexico and parts of Brazil. Overall, Dr. Sanchez has discovered that everywhere he goes or becomes in touch with, Hispanic/Latino Anusim are, “All over the place.”


Today, there are over 16,000 surnames that are of Sephardic Anusim origin. Most of them are commonly found among Hispanics/Latinos. The issue of onomastics or surnames is often the trigger for additional discoveries of Jewish roots within extended families.

Modern DNA testing methods have advanced many investigations. Very often, a DNA test is a short cut to establishing a family tree by discovering distant cousins that begin to fill the genealogical puzzle. Dr. Bennett Greenspan, founder and president of the Family Tree DNA Laboratory in Houston, Texas said that not a week goes by within which someone comes to him, telling him that they “feel” they have Jewish roots. Dr. Greenspan has discovered that after taking a DNA test, lo and behold, they discover that they do.

Stories told by aging members of one’s extended family often lead to oral histories. These oral histories give emergence to Sephardic cultural practices, customs and oral terms known as “Ladino,” (The language and dialect of Sephardim). Other issues that tend to enhance one’s search is the discovery of material objects that have been secretly or inconspicuously tucked away. Many of these evidences contain Hebrew signs, symbols or letters such as on gravestones, hidden mezuzahs and other objects.

Simply stated, it takes an inquiring mind with an appetite for truth.